[FREE] Three new workshops for teachers from Teaching London Computing on 18 and 26 May

We’ve added another three workshops to our activities and will be running these across two sessions in a couple of weeks. Our previous workshops (at Queen Mary University of London or as part of an invited talk elsewhere) have been very popular.

Workshop One: Mon 18 May 2015, 5.30 to 7pm

Explorers need maps: Abstraction, Representations and Graphs

Overview

Abstraction – essentially just hiding information – is a core part of computational thinking that is closely linked to the choice of data representation. We will give a deeper understanding of abstraction, providing fun ways to teach it, based on cs4fn / Teaching London Computing resources. The great explorers didn’t just wander around new continents finding things. They drew maps. Maps are just abstractions of the world. Based on games and puzzles, we will see how drawing a special kind of map called a graph and a variation the finite state machine is a part of computational thinking problem solving. They are useful tools for understanding how to use, exploring and designing computer systems.

Session material
This session will cover:

  • What is Computational Thinking?
  • Inspiring ways to teach Computational Thinking.
  • What is abstraction?
  • Why does the choice of data representation matter when solving problems?
  • What is a graph and why are they useful?
  • What is a finite state machine and why are they useful?

Eventbrite - QMUL 01: Paul Curzon workshop - Abstraction, Representations and Graphs for Workshop 1 – Abstraction, Representations and Graphs
More information about this workshop on our page for Abstraction, representations and graphs.

The second and third run on the same day at half-term, on Tuesday 26 May 2015 (you can come to the first or the second or both, but you will need to register for both separately).

Workshop Two: Tue 26 May 2015, 1.30 to 3pm

Primary Computing Unplugged

Overview

Computing doesn’t need to be taught at a computer and in fact to get across key concepts it is often better (and more fun) not to. This is especially true of the early stages of learning programming and computing more generally. A core idea behind the new computing syllabus is computational thinking. We will give you a deeper understanding of computational thinking and give practical ways to teach both it and other computing topics such as programming away from computers. Computational thinking is a fundamental skill set that students learn by studying computing. We will demonstrate a range of activities that show how core ideas and concepts can be introduced using fun unplugged activities and games. We will show that computing can be fun for everyone and that it doesn’t have to be taught at a computer.

Session material

This session presents a variety of activities from the other workshops. It will cover:

  • What is Computational Thinking?
  • Inspiring ways to teach Computational Thinking.
  • What is an algorithm
  • Writing your first program

Eventbrite - QMUL 02: Paul Curzon workshop - Primary Computing Unplugged for Workshop 2 – Primary computing unplugged
More information about this workshop on our page for Primary computing unplugged.

Workshop Three: Tue 26 May 2015, 3.30 to 5pm

The Magic of Computer Science

Overview

When you learn to be a magician, it turns out you are learning the skills needed to be a great computer scientist too: computational thinking. Just like software, magic is a combination of algorithms and presentation. In this workshop we will demonstrate some simple to do but strong magic tricks. We teach the group how they are done so they can do the tricks themselves and then use the magic to illustrate the linked basics of computing. Overall we will show what computational thinking is all about and how both magicians and computer scientists rely on it.

Session material

This session will demonstrate a variety of activities from the other workshops. It will cover:

  • What is Computational Thinking?
  • Inspiring ways to teach Computational Thinking using easy to learn magic tricks.

Eventbrite - QMUL 03: Paul Curzon workshop - The Magic of Computing for Workshop 3 – The magic of computing
More information about this workshop on our page for The magic of computing.

Teachers: Help your students build their own apps in the #AppsforGood course. Apply to deliver in 2015/16

AppsForGood are looking for Education Partners – here’s some information about them (and there’s a printable / shareable flyer at the end).

Print“Apps for Good is an education programme where students learn to build and pitch their own apps – helping students to become real-life entrepreneurs and digital creators.

The course meets the demands of the new curriculum in an engaging way and builds skills in teamwork, communication and problem solving.

Apps for Good provide their course framework, training and connections to tech Expert volunteers, and then let you do what you are best at – inspiring and guiding young people. Join 500 schools across the UK and apply to become an Education Partner: http://www.appsforgood.org/public/teach-apps-for-good – it’s free for non-fee paying schools.”

Follow them on Twitter  Screen Shot 2015-02-25 at 17.23.02  @appsforgoodcdi

Apps for Good – Info Flyer

New free workshop for Computing teachers – ‘Searching to Speak’ 22 May 2014, London

Cover of the Searching to Speak A5 booklet, click to open the PDF
Prof Paul Curzon will be running his FREE ‘Computational thinking: Searching to Speak‘ workshop for GCSE Computing teachers next Thursday afternoon at a school in London.

Eventbrite - Computational thinking: searching to speak - free workshop for teachers
When: Thursday 22 May 2014, 4pm-5.30pm
Where: Stormont House School, Downs Park Road, London, E5 8NP
Audience: GCSE Computing teachers
Cost: FREE

More info: Contact Jo Brodie (j.brodie@qmul.ac.uk) and see our workshop page for more details and downloadable resources.

Printed copies of the booklet, and other magazines from cs4fn (Computer Science For Fun) will be available for each delegate and you can sign up to receive free copies of our future magazines at the cs4fn website, and hear about our new courses and workshops.

Dates for your diary: Paul Curzon will also be delivering all four of his free workshops for GCSE Computing teachers on 27 and 28 May, at QMUL. More to follow…

Overview
One of the worst medical conditions I can imagine is locked-in syndrome. It leaves you totally paralyzed except perhaps for the blink of an eye. Your intelligent mind is locked inside a useless body, able to sense everything but unable to communicate. How could a computer scientist help? We will use this problem to illustrate a way to introduce computational thinking skills, as well as core computing topics such as search algorithms and how to compare them. More generally we will demonstrate how computational thinking ideas can be introduced in an integrated way using cs4fn ‘unplugged’ activities, games and magic tricks, getting students out of their seats and away from their computers.

Session material
This session will cover:

  • What is Computational Thinking?
  • Inspiring ways to teach Computational Thinking.
  • How do computers find things? Search algorithms.
  • How do we tell which algorithm is best? Efficiency Analysis.
  • An introduction to using magic tricks to teach computing concepts

Activities are suitable for all age groups and can be adapted to fit your teaching needs.

 

Free 1-day taster course for Y12 school students interested in electronics & computing, in June

Teachers of Y12 students might be interested in this free taster course on computer science and electronic engineering, to be held at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL). This is part of the University of London’s series of short taster courses for school students which QMUL participates in.

Please note that this is not a Teaching London Computing course.

IMG_0023[1]

Taster Course – Electronics and Computing for the Digital Age
Course Date: 26 Jun 2013
Duration: One day (10am – 4.15pm)
Cost: FREE, booking required

“This 1-day course will provide an excellent opportunity for students to experience some of the exciting things that our degrees in Electronic Engineering and/or Computer Science have to offer.

You will be shown just some of the choices that are open to you in terms of specialist skills you can learn and the outstanding career opportunities they afford. During the day you will get “hands-on” experience with various activities. You will also meet staff and some of our existing undergraduate students to get a feel for life with us.”

Subject area/s: Audio Systems Engineering, Computer Science, Electronic Engineering, Engineering (Audio Systems), Engineering (Electronic), Information and Communication Technologies, Information Technology (IT), Multimedia and Arts Technology, Technology, Telecommunications

Course Requirements: This taster course is open to year 12 students and anyone who is planning on starting their undergraduates studies in September 2014. Students should be studying either AS Maths or Physics (or equivalent).

Students can apply here, and will be asked to write 150 words on why they’re interested in studying computer science / electronic engineering.