List of sessions at the CAS London Conference 2018 – Sat 24th Feb

Updated 6 Feb 2018, v6

The CAS London Conference 2018 will be held on Saturday 24th February at Gladesmore Community College in North London (South Tottenham, N15 6BF). It’s an all day event with an opening keynote from Jon Nixon from Ofsted, and talks, workshops and demos exploring different aspects of Primary and Secondary Computer Science. Download a flyer.

There are four session blocks (2 in the morning, 2 in the aternoon) and you can pick one from each. The full list of workshop and talks is below the ‘plan for the day’.

Doors at 9.10am, opening keynote is at 9.40am, first morning session at 10.20am. There will be other activities and networking opportunities at lunch.

Eventbrite - CAS London Conference

CAS London Conference – plan for the day

Start End Session
09:10 09:35 Delegate registration and morning refreshments
09:40 10:15 Opening keynote John Nixon, Ofsted National Lead for Computing
10:20 11:20 Session 1
11:25 12:25 Session 2
12:30 13:30 Lunch & Drone Demonstration (Staggered lunch start 12:30 and 12:45)
13:35 14:35 Session 3
14:40 15:40 Session 4
15:45 16:15 Plenary: Cyber Schools Programme – Michael Heering (TBC) & Fireflies!

Session 1

  • Primary – Smelly code and primary programming pedagogy with Jane Waite
    In this hands of session, you will mark code and create a practical student checklist of what makes sweet code! Bring along code for marking! We will also look at two very practical methods to review your planning to reveal what pedagogy you already use. We will look at instructional approaches to scaffold learning as well as ideas for encouraging independence and mastery.
  • Primary – iPads Tried and test apps for classroom impact with Gillian Arnold
  • Secondary – pedagogy with William Lau
  • Secondary – AQA exam board session with  Chris Swan
  • Primary –  Using tangible programming to support SEN children with the computing curriculum with Jody Carter
  • Primary/Secondary – Minecraft (using virtual worlds and programming) with Simon Johnson (CLC Cimon)
  • Secondary – Python Introduction with Jon Feleppa
  • Creative projects with the micro:bit (python focus)
  • A level – Databases in Python with Hardip Mothada
  • A level – OOP with William Marsh

Session 2

  • KS2/3 – FastForward. Machine Learning & Big Data including digital identity With Paul Curzon and Jane Waite
    Are driverless cars fact or fiction? Can machines make better AI than humans can? How is our data used? Can we support our young people to understand their online (and real life) persona? Practical ideas for starters, plenaries and projects. 
  • Secondary – Algorithm writing with pseudo code and flow charts with Trevor Bragg
  • Secondary – Edexcel exam board with Atif Khan
  • Primary – Physical computing pedagogy session – not what to teach but how to teach physical – including use of spheros, microbits, bluebots, drones with Nic Hughes
  • Primary – Google classrooms/G Suite – Darren Murphey & Wendy McLeod
  • Secondary – Creating websites with HTML
  • Secondary – Stride (a framebased editor to transition from blocks to text) with Michael Koelling
  • A level – Teaching embedded systems with Arduino and Linker with Michael Jones
  • A level – Teaching Boolean Algebra & Karnaugh Maps with Eliot Williams

Session 3

  • Early Years and KS1 – Cubetto and Early Years with Helen Cheung & Eleni Vasileiadou
  • Drones with the Royal Academy of Engineering (KS3 focus but may be of interest to KS2) with Scott Atkinson & Ivan Gutowski-Smith
    This session will explore how drones work and how they can be used for civilian, humanitarian and commercial purposes. This resource is designed as an introduction to the uses of drones, aimed at dispelling the myth that they are just weapons or toys. In fact they have wider ranging practical civil, humanitarian and commercial applications. We will also explore how drones can be reverse engineered, exploring ways in which enquiring minds can build their own functioning quadcopter. All the resources are also available on our website at: https://www.raeng.org.uk/education/schools/teaching-and-learning-resources/curriculum-resources including Engineering in the Movies and RAF100 ‘Aiming for Awesome’ which will be demonstrated during this session.
  • A level – NEA project assessing/ standardisation with Garfield Godon
  • Secondary – OCR exam board with Vinay Thawait
  • Primary – Scratch Maths (Year 6 resources) with Pier Saunders (UCL)
  • KS1 to KS4 – Networks with Duncan Maidens (back by popular demand)
  • KS4 – Teaching data representation (with practical activities that involve manipulating images and sound in Python) with Alex Hawden-Bennet
  • KS3/4 – Pedagogy for programming – PRIMM with Sue Sentence
  • A level – C# with Martin Richards
  • KS4/5 Data Analysis with Jupyter Notebooks –Michel Wermelinger and Clifford French
    Michel Wermelinger will demonstrate how to use Python in Jupyter Notebooks, running in a browser, to analyse data on world diseases. Jupyter notebooks provide an intuitive, easy to use environment that integrates explanations, exercises and the output of the code so that students program incrementally and get immediate feedback. Teachers will be able to use what they learn both in computer science lessons and in Science or Geography at KS4 (or higher) with no need to install software.

Session 4

  • Primary – Assessment with Phil Bagge
  • KS3/4 – Embedding Computational Thinking with Rob Heathcote (PG Online)
  • Primary – Unplugged programming and programming with Scratch
  • Primary – LGFL cross curricula with VR with Bradely Dardis
  • KS2/3/4 – Cybersecurity with Duncan Maidens
  • KS4 – CraignDave – Challenges of teaching GCSE and flipped classroom solutions.
  • KS4/5 – Sorting and Searching Algorithms in Python with Demetrios Skamiotis
  • A level – Advanced Python e.g. Web Development Frameworks and Python with Sue Sentance
  • A level – Big O notation with Python with Ramzi Ramzi
    This session will cover what Big O is, explaining O(1), O(N), O(N^2), and O(log N). Practical online activities will get you  coding each example in Python using variously sized datasets (whilst hopefully not crashing all of computers!) By the end of the session, you will feel more confident explaining and showing students, what Big O is using Python.

Eventbrite - CAS London Conference

Two CAS London Teach A-Level Computer Science courses in Autumn 2017

Update 18 September 2017: The A2 Projects with Databases & Python course (pink in the diary image below) is now full but we have spaces on the Object Oriented Programming course at QMUL (blue in the image below). If you’re attending the A2DB course you’ll be able to attend the OOP one as well.

Screenshot 2017-10-13 10.57.40


We have two ‘Teach A Level Computer Science’ courses coming up later this year. Please bookmark this page as it will shortly be updated with details of the earlier course (to be held at Queen Mary University of London in October / Nov). The details of the later course (to be held at King’s College London Waterloo in Nov / Dec) are below. Both cost £100 and free places are available for CAS Master Teachers.

  1. Teach A-Level Computer Science: Object Oriented Programming
  2. Teach A-Level Computer Science: A2 Projects with Databases and Python

Please note that these courses are for in-service teachers who are already confident in teaching computing at GCSE level, Python will be the programming language used.

The course dates are arranged so that it will be possible for teachers to attend both courses.

 

1. Teach A-Level Computer Science: Object Oriented Programming

Find out more and book a place

Course dates

  • Wed 4 October
  • Wed 11 October
    [Break – Wed 18 Oct]
  • Wed 25 October
    [Break – 1 Nov]
  • Wed 8 Nov
  • Wed 15 Nov

Location: Queen Mary University of London
Tutor: Dr William Marsh, CAS London

2. Teach A-Level Computer Science: A2 Projects with Databases and Python

Find out more | Apply for a place

Course dates

  • Week 1 (1 Nov 2017) – Single table databases and sqlite3
    [Break – 8 Nov]
    [Break – 15 Nov]
  • Week 2 (22 Nov 2017) – Foreign keys and relationships
  • Week 3 (29 Nov 2017) – Many-many relationships
  • Week 4 (6 Dec 2017) – Developing a project for A-Level Part 1
  • Week 5 (13 Dec 2017) – Developing a project for A-Level Part 2

Location: King’s College London, Waterloo
Tutor: Dr Sue Sentance, CAS London

For more information please contact Jo (j.brodie@qmul.ac.uk)

Using London’s transport network to teach computing – free resource & workshop (12 June)

Summary

  1. Free London computing resource that uses London’s transport system to teach unplugged computing as well as Python programming – as part of the new London Curriculum
  2. Free teachers’ event on 12 June to demonstrate this resource
  3. It’s also #LondonHistoryDay soon – CAS London / Teaching London Computing has some other resources for your classroom

1. A new resource for computing teachers in London
Someone has come up with the rather lovely and brilliant idea of exploiting (in the best way) London itself as a resource to be used in teaching in schools. Obviously London has lots of history, architecture, transport, science and literary links and these aspects can feed into the curriculum for London schools. I wish I’d thought of it.
Teachers, working with the Mayor of London, have developed subject-relevant London-centric curricular packs for the London Curriculum which are free to access after registering.

Clifford French and Trevor Bragg have created a resource pack – The Connected City – for computer science teachers in London, using the theme of transportation on the city’s roads. Students can use Python to interact with freely available Transport for London data on buses, traffic lights, hire-bikes etc (similar to the way smartphone apps work) but also using by learning about computational thinking ideas that don’t involve programming, such as the unit on pedestrian crossings –

The role of computational thinking
This unit focuses on road traffic signals in London and how they are used to manage travel by road. This includes buses and cars but also pedestrians and cyclists. After a  general introduction to transport in London students are introduced to an ‘unplugged’ model of a pedestrian crossing signal.”
Source: The Connected City (available from the link above)

2. Free teachers’ event to demonstrate this new computing resource
To accompany this Trevor and Clifford are running a free event for computing teachers, on Monday 12 June, to demonstrate how they can use this resource in their classrooms.

Connected City – New Mayor of London, KS3 Computing Curriculum Workshop
Monday, June 12, 2017 from 4:00 PM to 6:00 PM (BST) London
Room 2.87 Franklin Wilkings Building
Eventbrite tickets: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/connected-city-new-mayor-of-london-ks3-computing-curriculum-workshop-tickets-34465710869

A Hands on workshop, giving you the chance to try out the Scratch and or Python lessons with support, along with fellow teachers to gain confidence, before you use at your school with your students.

For Scratch there will be modelling of Traffic lights and a Pedestrain Crossing.
For Python you will learn about objects, lists and dictionaries.

Transport for London data can be accessed without any code and from a Python program we will look at both.

This course and the resources it uses are available free.

“London is extraordinary. It has a wealth of cultural, heritage and scientific venues. It is exciting and inspiring. It is also a hotbed of invention and creativity. As such, there is no better classroom than London.

The Mayor’s London Curriculum uses the capital as inspiration to bring the new national curriculum to life at key stages 2 and 3. The programme offers free teaching resources, evening events for teachers and exciting educational activities for students.”
Source: The London Curriculum – learning inspired by London

3. #LondonHistoryDay
London’s first London History Day will take place next Wednesday 31 May 2017 but schools are being invited to encourage their students to take part this Friday (26 May) and dress up as a famous historical Londoner.

We thought schools might be interested in London’s history from a computing perspective and have put together this page which talks about computational thinking and computing ideas as they relate to the Romans, Tudors / Stuarts, Victorians, World War 2 and more modern history.

Find out more at London, History and Computing

Short courses at a glance

Short courses from CAS London
2017 course dates and prices are in brackets, similar prices and dates are envisaged for 2018.

  • KS3 Teach KS3 Computing – January to March
    (8 sessions, £160, 23 Jan to 20 Mar)
  • MA module in Computing Education – January to March
    (10 sessions, £1,150, 17 Jan to 28 Mar)
  • KS4 Teach GCSE Computer Science – April to July
    (10 sessions, £200, 24 Apr to 3 Jul)
  • KS5 Teach A level Computer Science: Algorithms and Data Structures – March
    (5 sessions, £100, 1 Mar to 29 Mar)
  • KS5 Teach A level Computer Science: Object Oriented Programming in Python – June to July
    (5 sessions, £100, 7 Jun to 5 Jul)
  • Diving Deep into Primary Programming – Summer / Winter
    (All-day session, £60, 9 Jun)
  • KS5 Teach A level Computer Science: A2 Projects with Databases and Python – September to November
    (5 sessions, £100, 1 Nov to 29 Nov – register of interest full, please contact Jo Brodie (j.brodie@qmul.ac.uk) for waiting list information)
  • Diving Deep into Primary Programming – Winter / Spring
    (All-day session, £60, tbc)